Did you know?

Most cemeteries have many varying rules and regulations regarding the size and type of memorial you can place on the grave. Some cemeteries will only allow bronze markers, where others only allow flat memorials (bronze or granite). Some cemeteries set restrictions on the size of the memorial as well as the size of cement borders required.


What to do... 

Check the rules and regulations of the cemetery before you purchase the plot.  Most consumers don't know the cemeteries restrictions until after the funeral.  Don't rely on looking at other memorials at the cemetery and assume you can do the same.  Many cemeteries add a clause to have the right to change their policies as they see fit.  For example, they may have once allowed upright stones, but now they will only allow flat ones.


Did you know?

A large percentage of bronze vases get stolen each year.  Bronze vases are very ornate & beautiful, but they are also costly especially if you end up replacing them every couple of years.  Bronze can be melted down and sold, therefore they seem to attract theft.


What to do...

If you still want to buy a bronze vase, check with your cemetery regarding their security procedures and percentage of theft. Invert the vase into protective casing when not in use.  Maintain the chain between the vase & casing. Even though it can be broken if someone wants it badly enough, it will at least deter theft.  There are alternative vases that look ornate and beautiful but are not made of bronze. Instead they are made of a cast metal and don't have the cash value a bronze vase has.

  

Did you know?

The price of a memorial will vary greatly depending on the color of the granite used, as well as the number of sides polished.  To confuse the issue, there are many different words used to describe a memorial: headstone, gravestone, monument, tombstone, memorial, slant, marker, grave marker, etc.  With so many different terminologies- how do you compare "apples to apples" so to speak.


What to do...

Become familiar with memorial stones terminology.  A flat stone for one individual is usually called a "single marker."  A flat stone for two people is a "double marker" or "companion marker."  An upright stone is called a "monument" or a "slant".  (The slant is a wedge shaped stone, the face is angled and the back straight.)  A monument is straight up on the front and back and the top shape can vary, depending on your preference.  Ask for specific colors and where the stone is quarried when requesting prices.


Did you know?

Most memorials placed on the grave, within two months after burial, will sink unevenly during the first year, requiring extra expense to have it leveled again.


What to do...

Wait 3 to 6 months before having a memorial installed on the grave.  If your memorial does need to be raised, check to see if you've paid a maintenance fee to your cemetery.  If you have, this fee usually covers having the stone raised as well as perpetual care for the memorial.  You can also contact your memorial dealer or memorial repair specialist to raise it for a nominal fee.


Did you know?

Many large monument retailers do not engrave their own memorials.  They act as a middleman between the engraver and the customer. Not knowing who will do the actual work on your stone may affect quality and impair your decision on which memorial retailer to use.  Also, these memorial retailers who use a middleman engraver will often inflate their prices, which you would otherwise have avoided.


What to do...

Don't be afraid to ask where your memorial is being made.  If it is being made at another monument dealer, ask how long this company has been in business and how long they have had a relationship with them.  You should feel as comfortable with the memorial engraver as you are with the retailer you are purchasing it from.  (Tip: Call that engraving company directly to see if you can purchase the stone directly from them, saving you money.)

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